How does Archie talk Jerry into participating in the boxing match in The Chocolate War?

How does Archie talk Jerry into participating in the boxing match in The Chocolate War?

How does Archie talk Jerry into participating in the boxing match in The Chocolate War?

How does Archie talk Jerry into participating in the boxing match in The Chocolate War?

Archie talks Jerry into participating in the boxing match with a carefully planned program of manipulation. He first breaks Jerry down, arranging for his locker to be vandalized and for him to be goaded and beaten up by the school tough, Emile Janza. He then instigates a campaign of harrassment, tormenting Jerry with an endless series of threatening phone calls at home. Archie engineers to have the entire student body, and possibly even the teachers, “freeze” Jerry out of existence, refusing to acknowledge through word or action that he exists, even as he circulates among them. When Jerry is thoroughly frustrated and angry, Archie then approaches him, offering him a chance to get back at his tormentors.Convincing Jerry to take part in the boxing match requires Archie to use all of his manipulative skills and resourcefulness. Like the serpent in the Garden, Archie asks Jerry, “Want to get even?…Strike back? Get revenge? Show them what you  think of their goddam chocolates?” Despite himself, Jerry is interested in what Archie has to say, and when Archie brings up the idea of a boxing match in front of an assembly of the students with “everything under control,” Jerry rises to the bait. Archie says nothing about the format of the match, and Jerry does not think to ask. Jerry falls completely for Archie’s assurance that this will be “a chance to end it all and get on with other things” (Chapter 35).
How does Archie talk Jerry into participating in the boxing match in The Chocolate War?

What are some literary elements in Act 3?

What are some literary elements in Act 3?

What are some literary elements in Act 3?

What are some literary elements in Act 3?

Act IIIs are usually the turning points in Shakespeare’s tragedies.  Here are the key shifts:Here, Macbeth goes even further toward the dark side: he killed his king in Act II, and now he kills his best friend Banquo.Also, Banquo (Macbeth’s foil) will become his doppelganger and literally haunt him.  He is a revenge ghost, another element of the supernatural.We begin to see the gender differences emerging.  Macbeth separates from Lady Macbeth (she does not plan Banquo’s murder).And, we have the foreshadowing of madness evident, particularly with Macbeth, even though Lady Macbeth will be afflicted more seveley. Foreshadowing: Banquo says, “Thou hast it now: king, Cawdor, Glamis, all, As the weird women promised, and, I fear, Thou play’dst most foully for’t:”Verbal Irony: Macbeth says, “I wish your horses swift and sure of foot; And so I do commend you to their backs. Farewell.”Soliloquy: Macbeth says, “To be thus is nothing; But to be safely thus….”Death/Sleep Imagery: Macbeth says, “In the affliction of these terrible dreamsThat shake us nightly: better be with the dead,Whom we, to gain our peace, have sent to peace,Than on the torture of the mind to lieIn restless ecstasy. Duncan is in his grave;After life’s fitful fever he sleeps well;Treason has done his worst: nor steel, nor poison,Malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing,Can touch him further.Blood / Death Imagery:Blood hath been shed ere now, i’ the olden time,Ere human statute purged the gentle weal;Ay, and since too, murders have been perform’dToo terrible for the ear: the times have been,That, when the brains were out, the man would die,And there an end; but now they rise again,With twenty mortal murders on their crowns,And push us from our stools: this is more strangeThan such a murder is.
What are some literary elements in Act 3?

In "The Pulley" what is the one gift God does NOT bestow on human kind?I’m thinking peace or rest.

In "The Pulley" what is the one gift God does NOT bestow on human kind?I’m thinking peace or rest.

In "The Pulley" what is the one gift God does NOT bestow on human kind?I’m thinking peace or rest.

In "The Pulley" what is the one gift God does NOT bestow on human kind?I’m thinking peace or rest.

I think that it is clearly stated in the poem that rest is the one gift that God did not give out to the world.  I think you are right to say that rest is pretty much the same thing as peace.You can see that rest is the one gift not given because it says so at the end of the second stanza.God did not give rest and peace to the people because he was afraid that people would have no reason to seek him if they had rest and peace.  So instead, he wanted people to lack rest so they would, as the last lines of the poem say, seek God so they could find rest.
In "The Pulley" what is the one gift God does NOT bestow on human kind?I’m thinking peace or rest.

What did Ralph find? How was it used?

What did Ralph find? How was it used?

What did Ralph find? How was it used?

What did Ralph find? How was it used?

I assume that you are talking about what is found by Ralph and by Piggy in Chapter 1.  What they find is a conch shell lying there in the shallow water.At first, Ralph has no idea what to do with the shell.  But Piggy suggests that they can use it as a horn.  They can use it to notify anyone else who survived the crash that other people are alive on the island.  This is the first use of the conch.Later, the conch becomes the thing that shows whose turn it is to talk at meetings — whoever holds it gets to speak.
What did Ralph find? How was it used?

My bro got arrested for robbing 3 banks, shooting at 3 police officers and so on, what will his sentance most likly be if he pleads guilty?This is…

My bro got arrested for robbing 3 banks, shooting at 3 police officers and so on, what will his sentance most likly be if he pleads guilty?This is…

My bro got arrested for robbing 3 banks, shooting at 3 police officers and so on, what will his sentance most likly be if he pleads guilty?This is…

My bro got arrested for robbing 3 banks, shooting at 3 police officers and so on, what will his sentance most likly be if he pleads guilty?This is…

There are a number of variables here, given that bank robbery is a federal crime that will be tried in federal court, and shooting at police officers (I’m assuming they were local or state officers) is a state crime and will be prosecuted in state court.  So your brother will be involved in two trials/criminal cases regardless of how he pleads.  Typically this means the lower charges won’t be pursued so that the person can get the longest possible jail sentence.  This complicates things greatly for your brother.First, if he does not already have legal counsel, be sure that he gets it.  Second, if he can’t afford legal counsel, the court will need to provide it for him.  He should do this before he decides to enter a plea, as the lawyer can tell you much more accurately the kind of sentence he may be looking at.For the bank robberies, there is a federal “truth in sentencing” guideline, meaning no chance of parole, and only a maximum of 54 days off of the sentence per year of good behavior.  Pleading guilty to all three bank robberies would likely net a sentence of at least 25 years.The state charges are no better, but it depends on the state the shootings took place in.  The crime will likely be three counts of attempted murder of a police officer (assuming none of them were wounded, which would lead to additional charges).  I would expect no less than 25 years for a sentence, even if he pleads guilty.Again, please seek legal counsel as soon as possible, so that your brother is treated fairly and legally.
My bro got arrested for robbing 3 banks, shooting at 3 police officers and so on, what will his sentance most likly be if he pleads guilty?This is…

How many terms has an arithmetical progression (an), where n> = 1, r = 3, an = 16 and the sum of the first n terms of progression is Sn = 50?

How many terms has an arithmetical progression (an), where n> = 1, r = 3, an = 16 and the sum of the first n terms of progression is Sn = 50?

How many terms has an arithmetical progression (an), where n> = 1, r = 3, an = 16 and the sum of the first n terms of progression is Sn = 50?

How many terms has an arithmetical progression (an), where n> = 1, r = 3, an = 16 and the sum of the first n terms of progression is Sn = 50?

How many terms has an arithmetical progression (an), where n> = 1, r = 3, an = 16 and the sum of the first n terms of progression is Sn = 50?

Discuss Joyce’s "Araby" as a modern short story, including elements of modernism in your discussion.

Discuss Joyce’s "Araby" as a modern short story, including elements of modernism in your discussion.

Discuss Joyce’s "Araby" as a modern short story, including elements of modernism in your discussion.

Discuss Joyce’s "Araby" as a modern short story, including elements of modernism in your discussion.

With the effects of world wars and the Freudian movement along with Darwinism, the Romantic movement saw its end as Modernism came into being.  This movement is characterized with a marked pessimism in its examination of subject matter is much more mundane, With James Joyce’s The Dubliners, from which “Araby” comes, there is concern with city life as a central force in society, with the individual often standing alone attemptingto preserve the autonomy of his existence in the face of overwhelming social forces, of historical heritage, of external culture, and of the technique of life. [sociologist Georg Simmel]As a modern short story, then, Joyce’s “Araby” places a boy in the impecunious environment of North Richmond Street in Dublin, Ireland, where the houses are brown.  Joyce himself referred to the brown brick houses as the “incarnation of Irish paralysis,” a phrase he uses to characterize the powerlessness of the Irish to change their hopeless situations through individual action.In “Araby,” the young man is the narrator who romanticizes his infatuation with his friend’s sister as he uses the exotic word araby to suggest the exciting world of romance.  He imagines further that at the market on Saturdays, he carries, not the groceries, but the holy grail for his fair maiden. The narrator’s confusion with reality and truth is something that he brings on himself in the midst of the brown houses and even the girl’s brown dress, which suggests that she is not what he imagines.  His pure thoughts of the grail are, in reality, sullied by his watching her and imagining the border of her slip as well his voyeurism as he peeks under the shade.  That his idealism is doomed to failure is further determined by the unconcern of the uncle and his flippancy after he returns too late for the narrator to get to the bazaar before it closes.  Then, when the boy reaches the bazaar, he realizes in his epiphany that he has been “a creature driven and derided by vanity.”  Ashamed of his silly romantic ideas, the boy’s eyes fill with tears in “anguish and anger.” Trapped in his brown city life, the narrator feels the overwhelming pessimism and “paralysis” of his lonely existence.
Discuss Joyce’s "Araby" as a modern short story, including elements of modernism in your discussion.