What things does the speaker say are gone forever when you die in "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard"?

What things does the speaker say are gone forever when you die in "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard"?

What things does the speaker say are gone forever when you die in "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard"?

What things does the speaker say are gone forever when you die in "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard"?

The speaker in Thomas Gray’s “An Ellegy Written in a Country Churchyard” writes of things that will no longer occur for the dead in the churchyard, as well as things the dead will no longer get to do. The speaker writes:For them no more the blazing hearth shall burn,Or busy housewife ply her evening care;No children run to lisp their sire’s return,Or climb his knees the envied kiss to share.The fireplace will no longer burn for the dead, housewives will no longer take care of them in the evenings, and children will no longer run to greet them or climb on their knees to give them kisses.In the next stanza the speaker mentions things the dead will no longer get to do:  harvest crops, plow, drive their teams, and chop wood.The stanzas following these two deal with a different issue.  They make the point that no matter what someone possesses–power, beauty, wealth, glory, etc.–that someone will still die.  The emphasis here, though, is not what is left behind, but on the fact that death will come no matter what.
What things does the speaker say are gone forever when you die in "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard"?
What things does the speaker say are gone forever when you die in "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard"?
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What things does the speaker say are gone forever when you die in "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard"?
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