What is personification in English literature?Describe it.

What is personification in English literature?Describe it.

What is personification in English literature?Describe it.

What is personification in English literature?Describe it.

Personification is a figure of speech.  It is not supposed to be realistic or believable.  It is not literal.  A poet, or any writer for that matter, can use personification in order to convey an idea, entertain, make a point, create a tone.  For instance, Emily Dickinson personifies death as as kindly gentleman who stops for the speaker to take her to her final resting place in “Because I Could Not Stop for Death.”  Here death drives a carriage, politely gives the speaker a ride, and points the horses’ heads to eternity.  Dickinson is not trying to make this portrayal of death realistic.  Instead, she is conveying the idea that death is not to be feared, that there is an afterlife, and that the grave is our next home.  An apostrophe can include personification, if the object is treated as if it is human.  For instance, Donne’s sonnet “Death Be Not Proud” is an apostrophe.  The speaker addresses death as one who is vain, boastful, conceited.  Death dwells in the worst of places with sickness, war, and hunger.  It thinks it has dominion over men, but in actuality, it does not.  It thinks it can kill, but it cannot.  But, again, Donne is not trying to be realistic here; he is showing us by using a figure of speech, personification, that death is nothing to fear.  We can transcend death in the afterlife.You probably use personification in your everyday life when you say such things as Lady Luck or call your car a “she,” or even refer to your stomach growling, or call your computer “baby” (Well, that’s what I do anyway, especially when she’s being ornery and slow).
What is personification in English literature?Describe it.