Two questions from Romeo and Juliet.How would an Elizabethan audience respond to a specifc line contrasted to how a modern audeince respoind?How…

Two questions from Romeo and Juliet.How would an Elizabethan audience respond to a specifc line contrasted to how a modern audeince respoind?How…

Two questions from Romeo and Juliet.How would an Elizabethan audience respond to a specifc line contrasted to how a modern audeince respoind?How…

Two questions from Romeo and Juliet.How would an Elizabethan audience respond to a specifc line contrasted to how a modern audeince respoind?How…

(One question per day, please.  I’ll answer the first one, and you can ask the second one tomorrow).Look at the exchange between Paris and Lord Capulet.  An Elizabethan audience might agree with Paris, that a 13 year-old (soon to be 14 year-old) might be ready to marry.  A modern audience would shudder at the idea of an arranged marriage, let alone one that involves a girl below the age of 18.  Even 16, as Capulet suggests, is too young by today’s standards.Paris:Of honourable reckoning are you both;And pity ’tis you lived at odds so long.But now, my lord, what say you to my suit?Lord Capulet:But saying o’er what I have said before:My child is yet a stranger in the world;She hath not seen the change of fourteen years,Let two more summers wither in their pride,Ere we may think her ripe to be a bride.
Two questions from Romeo and Juliet.How would an Elizabethan audience respond to a specifc line contrasted to how a modern audeince respoind?How…