Throughout the story, Baba worries because Amir never stands up for himself. When does that change?

Throughout the story, Baba worries because Amir never stands up for himself. When does that change?

Throughout the story, Baba worries because Amir never stands up for himself. When does that change?

Throughout the story, Baba worries because Amir never stands up for himself. When does that change?

Amir’s true breakthrough in Khaled Hosseini’s novel, The Kite Runner, only occurs after he returns to Afghanistan to track down Hassan’s son (and Amir’s nephew), Sohrab. Amir decides to make the perilous trip back to the Taliban-controlled Kabul, where he discovers that Sohrab has been traded to the Taliban by the director of an orphanage. Amir visits the soccer stadium and makes contact with the Taliban official who apparently holds Sohrab. When Amir finally locates Sohrab, he finds that the boy has been used as a sexual play-toy of the Taliban; the leader of the group turns out to be none other than Amir’s boyhood enemy, Assef. He makes a deal with Assef to take Sohrab away, and then he firmly remains to take the beating of his life by Assef. Amir is saved only when Sohrab blinds Assef with a projectile from his trusty slingshot. Amir and Sohrab escape to their waiting vehicle and return to the relative safety of Pakistan.
Throughout the story, Baba worries because Amir never stands up for himself. When does that change?