Please translate this into modern English.Why, is not this better now than groaning for love? Now art thou sociable, now art thou Romeo , now art…

Please translate this into modern English.Why, is not this better now than groaning for love? Now art thou sociable, now art thou Romeo , now art…

Please translate this into modern English.Why, is not this better now than groaning for love? Now art thou sociable, now art thou Romeo , now art…

Please translate this into modern English.Why, is not this better now than groaning for love? Now art thou sociable, now art thou Romeo , now art…

The previous post did a nice job of explaining the context of the lines.  Part of what makes these lines so powerful is that they seek to help bring a sense of focus and proportion to the disproportionate world of Romeo.  Throughout the play, Romeo never really sees anything in context.  His malaise prior to seeing Juliet, his first encounter with her, and his demeanor throughout the courting process/ infatuation with Juliet are a series of interactions that are disproportionate and out of focus with reality.  Mercutio’s lines help to bring some level of proportionality and sense of focus to Romeo’s life where there is no focus.  The ideas of being able to not “whine” about his predicament as well possessing the capacity to accept some conditions of reality as they are are both present in these lines.
Please translate this into modern English.Why, is not this better now than groaning for love? Now art thou sociable, now art thou Romeo , now art…