Why is DNA a suitable molecule for storing genetic information?Please, pay particular reference to the pairing of nitrogenous bases and their…

Why is DNA a suitable molecule for storing genetic information?Please, pay particular reference to the pairing of nitrogenous bases and their…

Why is DNA a suitable molecule for storing genetic information?Please, pay particular reference to the pairing of nitrogenous bases and their…

Why is DNA a suitable molecule for storing genetic information?Please, pay particular reference to the pairing of nitrogenous bases and their…

DNA is a suitable molecule for storing genetic information for many reasons. First of all, the genetic code is universal to all life on earth. There are four different nucleotides, or units of DNA. A nucleotide contains a sugar-deoxyribose, a phosphate group and a nitrogenous base.  There are four bases, adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine. DNA is a double helix which means there are two sides to the molecule. To visualize, picture the zipper on your pants. The teeth in the middle interlock much the same way the bases do in DNA. Remember, there are rules for base pairing- Adenine pairs with Thymine and Cytosine with Guanine.When DNA needs to be copied or replicated, for cell division or for reproduction when producing sex cells, DNA is amazing as it is the only substance on earth that can copy itself. When the strands in the double helix unwind and separate, each side can be used as a template (model) to make another strand. Thus, during DNA replication, one double stranded molecule of DNA when it “unzips” can form two exact double stranded replicas of itself.Finally, DNA even has the ability to fix any mistakes that may occur during its replication although as an organism ages, this system may not always work correctly and errors or mutations can occur.In conclusion DNA which makes up our genetic code is the oldest language on earth storing the genetic information for a bacteria all the way to a complex human being.
Why is DNA a suitable molecule for storing genetic information?Please, pay particular reference to the pairing of nitrogenous bases and their…

"The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" has six parts that reflect christian restoration. Please quote and explain.1. The offense ( his sin/crime) 2….

"The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" has six parts that reflect christian restoration. Please quote and explain.1. The offense ( his sin/crime) 2….

"The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" has six parts that reflect christian restoration. Please quote and explain.1. The offense ( his sin/crime) 2….

"The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" has six parts that reflect christian restoration. Please quote and explain.1. The offense ( his sin/crime) 2….

Concerning your question about Coleridge’s “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” we editors are only supposed to answer one question at a time.  Plus, we shouldn’t do all the work for you.  So I’ll compromise by identifying parts 1-6 for you, but I’ll let you find the quotes.  This is easier than it seems.  Coleridge’s own notes in the margins of the poem are easy reading and will help you determine where to look.The mariner kills the albatross.He’s made to feel sorry for his action because his action brings about hardships for him and the other sailors, and leads to the destruction of the ship.The mariner is cursed with a compulsion to tell his story whenever the compulsion comes upon him.Everyone on the ship is killed except him, and the ship is destroyed.He is rescued from the sea by a holy Hermit.See #3.That should help you get started.
"The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" has six parts that reflect christian restoration. Please quote and explain.1. The offense ( his sin/crime) 2….

What is Jim’s ideals of being rich in the novel "Huckelberry Finn?"

What is Jim’s ideals of being rich in the novel "Huckelberry Finn?"

What is Jim’s ideals of being rich in the novel "Huckelberry Finn?"

What is Jim’s ideals of being rich in the novel "Huckelberry Finn?"

I am not sure exactly what you mean by “ideals of being rich.”  However, I think what you may be talking about is the part where he says that he was once rich.  He says that at one point in the past he was rich because he had 14 dollars.  So perhaps the answer is that his idea of being rich is having that amount of money.The part I’m talking about is in Chapter 8.  Jim doesn’t say how he got the $14.  However, he does tell Huck about how he lost the money.
What is Jim’s ideals of being rich in the novel "Huckelberry Finn?"

What do we learn about Sir Gawain’s character from this selection from Sir Gawain and the Green Knight?’Would you, my worthy lord,’ said Wawain to…

What do we learn about Sir Gawain’s character from this selection from Sir Gawain and the Green Knight?’Would you, my worthy lord,’ said Wawain to…

What do we learn about Sir Gawain’s character from this selection from Sir Gawain and the Green Knight?’Would you, my worthy lord,’ said Wawain to…

What do we learn about Sir Gawain’s character from this selection from Sir Gawain and the Green Knight?’Would you, my worthy lord,’ said Wawain to…

We learn several things about Sir Gawain from this passage in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.Gawain fulfills the requirements of chivalry in this passage.  The challenge by the Green Knight is below the exalted King Arthur, says Gawain, so he politely requests that the king allow him to take up the challenge.  Gawain says he knows that he is the least of all the knights present, and that the only reason he is anything at all is because he is related to King Arthur.  The challenge is more fitting for Gawain to accept, than it is for King Arthur.We learn, then, that Gawain is honorable, considerate, polite, and humble.  He is a chivalrous knight of the round table.
What do we learn about Sir Gawain’s character from this selection from Sir Gawain and the Green Knight?’Would you, my worthy lord,’ said Wawain to…

What news does Hornbeck reveal in Inherit the Wind? How does this news affect people? Why is it significant?

What news does Hornbeck reveal in Inherit the Wind? How does this news affect people? Why is it significant?

What news does Hornbeck reveal in Inherit the Wind? How does this news affect people? Why is it significant?

What news does Hornbeck reveal in Inherit the Wind? How does this news affect people? Why is it significant?

The question seems to be a bit vague, but I think that the most important news that Hornbeck reveals to the townspeople is that Henry Drummond is going to defend Bert Cates in his trial.  The mention of Drummond causes an audible gasp and definable pause amongst the town people.  They begin to gossip amongst themselves on how Drummond defended two murderers, as well as how this will add to the “godless” nature of Cates’ stance.  It is significant because Henry Drummond will become the critical force in the process of questioning and examination about spiritual values and how they help to influence beliefs and policy.
What news does Hornbeck reveal in Inherit the Wind? How does this news affect people? Why is it significant?

What does Gatsby represent to Nick?

What does Gatsby represent to Nick?

What does Gatsby represent to Nick?

What does Gatsby represent to Nick?

Gatsby represents the ideal American Dream to Nick for good reasons as well as bad, which gives us something to think about as readers… although ambition is admirable, do we ever want to pursue something so seriously that it ends up hurting people?Gatsby was successful, you could call him popular because of his parties, and Nick noted that. Nick wanted to spend time with Gatsby and hoped to be his friend. The phrase Gatsby donned on him, “old sport”, made Nick feel liked.On the other hand, Nick saw through Gatsby. Nick goes to great lengths at the beginning of chapter 1 and the end of chapter 3 to tell us how honest he is, which should make us believe his narration over anything else said.Nick’s narration notes Gatsby’s nervous nature regularly: he chokes over words, he “was never quite still”. Gatsby was always restless. Nick knew when Gatsby lied.Gatsby represents the lengths people go to in order to achieve their ambitions, often people do this and succeed,  even in a deceptive way. Nick defines this throughout the book.
What does Gatsby represent to Nick?

Other than the fact that they have a vivid imagination what other similarities do Paul and Conradin have?From "Sredni Vashtar" and "The Rocking…

Other than the fact that they have a vivid imagination what other similarities do Paul and Conradin have?From "Sredni Vashtar" and "The Rocking…

Other than the fact that they have a vivid imagination what other similarities do Paul and Conradin have?From "Sredni Vashtar" and "The Rocking…

Other than the fact that they have a vivid imagination what other similarities do Paul and Conradin have?From "Sredni Vashtar" and "The Rocking…

Paul and Conradin do, in fact, have vivid imaginations.Something else that they have in common is that both children are adversely affected by the environment created by the “parent” in the story.In addition, their imaginations transform into obsessions.  The obsessions become an outlet for each child, and each obsession changes the child, driven by an outside influence.  (E.g., Paul is worried about money; Conradin is thwarted and controlled by his guardian.)Lastly, each obsessive behavior ends with some kind of tragedy, but here the stories diverge in that Paul suffers in “The Rocking Horse Winner,” while Conradin is vindicated–eerily–in “Sredni Vashtar.”
Other than the fact that they have a vivid imagination what other similarities do Paul and Conradin have?From "Sredni Vashtar" and "The Rocking…

Who are these two men, and what they have in common?

Who are these two men, and what they have in common?

Who are these two men, and what they have in common?

Who are these two men, and what they have in common?

I assume that you are talking about Sanger Rainsford and General Zaroff.What they have in common is, I think, a couple of things.  First of all, they are both very interested in hunting.  They have both done a great deal of big game hunting and are quite good at it.Second, they have both been involved in wars, presumably the First World War.I think these two things give them something else in common.  They are both pretty ruthless.  They are willing to do whatever is necessary to accomplish their goals.Finally, the ending of the story implies that maybe they will have yet more in common because it is implied that Rainsford might just keep Zaroff’s operation going with himself as the hunter.
Who are these two men, and what they have in common?

Where did Jonas take Gabe?

Where did Jonas take Gabe?

Where did Jonas take Gabe?

Where did Jonas take Gabe?

I assume that you are talking about where Jonas takes Gabe at the end of the book.  Basically, he takes Gabe away from the community where they have lived all their lives.  He sneaks him very far (we do not know how far) away, until they get to the point where, it is implied, they have come to the border between the community and “elsewhere.”When they get there, Jonas finds the sled from his “memory” and starts down the hill with Gabe.  We do not know what they will find down there, but they are definitely headed for “elsewhere.”
Where did Jonas take Gabe?

What do you think Dickens wanted his message to bein Great Expectations?In your response, please indicate your reasoning.

What do you think Dickens wanted his message to bein Great Expectations?In your response, please indicate your reasoning.

What do you think Dickens wanted his message to bein Great Expectations?In your response, please indicate your reasoning.

What do you think Dickens wanted his message to bein Great Expectations?In your response, please indicate your reasoning.

In Charles Dickens’s classic, Great Expectations, the character named Mr. Jaggers tells Pip, “Take nothing on appearances.”  And, this is a lesson that Pip learns, and one that Dickens wanted his readers to grasp, as well.  For, Dickens was very much an advocate of the lower classes of London, feeling that they were dealt injustices because of their “appearances”: their poverty and their lack of education. This theme of appearances vs. reality is developed throughout the novel.  As a child, Pip becomes ashamed of being “common” because the young lady, Estella, has ridiculed him.  The reality is that Estella is more common than Pip since she is the child of two convicts.  Pip yearns to become a gentleman, for he believes that by doing so he will be a superior person and Estella will, then, love him; however, the reality is that Pip has become counterfeit and the man that he is ashamed of when he comes to visit Pip in London, Joe, is a far better person. Believing the upperclass Miss Havisham is superior to him because she is wealthy is also a deception.  That she is his benefactor is another since it is Magwitch who is really his benefactor.  Judging Magwitch by his appearances, Pip is repulsed to think that a man of the lowest class is his benefactor, despite Magwitch’s great love for him.However, when Magwitch/Provis lies dying, Pip’s kind nature that he demonstrated as a child re-emerges and he cares for the old man. When Miss Havisham’s decaying dress catches on fire and Pip saves her, burning his hands, and Joe nurses him back to health, Pip realizes the value of real love and friendship.  At last, he has learned to take nothing on appearances, and to look for what is genuine, instead.Great Expectations is a bildungsroman, and there are many lessons that younger readers can learn; one of these lessons is to not judge things or people by how they appear to be. In Chapter LVIII as Pip describes his life with Herbert and his wife, he narrates,We owed so much to Herbert’s ever cheerful industry and readiness that I often wondered how I had conceived that old idea of his inaptitude, until I was one day enlightened by the reflection, that perhaps the inaptitude had never been in him at all, but had been in me.
What do you think Dickens wanted his message to bein Great Expectations?In your response, please indicate your reasoning.