What would the astrologer have done if he had not left his village?

What would the astrologer have done if he had not left his village?

What would the astrologer have done if he had not left his village?

What would the astrologer have done if he had not left his village?

I have altered your question to read, “What would the astrologer have done if he had not left his village?” We know that the astrologer had to leave his village, and much of the story is about what he did. As far as what he would have done if he had stayed in his village, the author R. K. Narayan tells us the answer specifically.He had left his village without any previous thought or plan. If he had continued there he would have carried on the work of his forefathers namely, tilling the land, living, marrying, and ripening in his cornfield.He would have led a life like that of hundreds of previous generations of Indian peasants, but this unique individual was forced to flee to a big city and become an entirely different person. People who live on the land can survive without any money, but everything in the city depends upon money. The protagonist had to find a way to survive. He probably became an astrologer by accident when he got hold of the few bits of old “professional equipment” he uses to attract and impress passers-by. A peasant like himself did not have many options. He might have gotten work as a day laborer. He had no skills to offer. He might have had to beg–but there are so many beggars in Indian cities that he could have starved to death. How do all these other people survive?Problems are often opportunities in disguise. The astrologer discovered that he had a talent for understanding and interacting with people. He was as much a stranger to the stars as his innocent customers. Yet he said things which pleased and astonished everyone: that was more a matter of study, practice, and shrewd guesswork.By the time the story opens, the protagonist is no longer a simple, superstitious, ignorant peasant. He has become urbane. He is a city dweller. He knows how to get hold of those little coins that mean so much. He has become relatively successful. Not only can he support himself, but he now has a wife and a child. No doubt there will be more children, and his responsibilities will be heavier. But he has evidently found a niche in which he and his family can survive.
What would the astrologer have done if he had not left his village?

When the fourth commandment is changed, why doesn’t Clover trust her own memory about its original wording?

When the fourth commandment is changed, why doesn’t Clover trust her own memory about its original wording?

When the fourth commandment is changed, why doesn’t Clover trust her own memory about its original wording?

When the fourth commandment is changed, why doesn’t Clover trust her own memory about its original wording?

This is demonstrating the effects of propaganda and the satirical nature of the entire book. Clover’s mistrust of her own memory is coming from habitually being told lies. When people are lied to enough, they start to believe them, especially if the lies are so closely related to the truth. Every time a commandment is changed… it is just a few words that are added or affected.Squealer does a great job being a reinforcer of propaganda as he asks questions that challenge the other animals to question their own beliefs of the past. Squealer effectively provides arguments too about why things need to be the way they are, for the pigs mental benefit in most scenarios.
When the fourth commandment is changed, why doesn’t Clover trust her own memory about its original wording?

What was Frankenstein’s state of mind after the trial?Was he inspired to make another creature? or was he just relieved that it was over?

What was Frankenstein’s state of mind after the trial?Was he inspired to make another creature? or was he just relieved that it was over?

What was Frankenstein’s state of mind after the trial?Was he inspired to make another creature? or was he just relieved that it was over?

What was Frankenstein’s state of mind after the trial?Was he inspired to make another creature? or was he just relieved that it was over?

Victor Frankenstein is the gothic villain-hero whose soul is in chaos; he becomes irrational and somewhat twisted in his thinking as he once leaves his loving world of family after each trial.  He feels compelled to destroy the creature, but his pride will not allow him to confess his act against Nature. After the trials of his loved ones, he does feel some guilt, but he always considers his own self-preservation first; that is, until he become desperate in his drive to destroy the creature.
What was Frankenstein’s state of mind after the trial?Was he inspired to make another creature? or was he just relieved that it was over?

Language is a system made up of different aspects/ components. Explain these aspects with examples from the English language.

Language is a system made up of different aspects/ components. Explain these aspects with examples from the English language.

Language is a system made up of different aspects/ components. Explain these aspects with examples from the English language.

Language is a system made up of different aspects/ components. Explain these aspects with examples from the English language.

Language is a system made up of different aspects/ components. Explain these aspects with examples from the English language.