Hardy describes "Mr Henchard as a man of strong impulses." Discuss briefly with the reference to the wife selling episodes.

Hardy describes "Mr Henchard as a man of strong impulses." Discuss briefly with the reference to the wife selling episodes.

Hardy describes "Mr Henchard as a man of strong impulses." Discuss briefly with the reference to the wife selling episodes.

Hardy describes "Mr Henchard as a man of strong impulses." Discuss briefly with the reference to the wife selling episodes.

Michael Henchard’s impulsivity is evident in his actions. Of course, his most recklessly spontaneous act occurs in the first chapter of the text. While surreptitiously imbibing rum from his bowl of furmity, he shockingly sells his wife (and child) for a pittance.  The following morning, he is seemingly repentant, even manifesting an adequate degree of sorrow for his actions. However, he repeats his spontaneous and impulsive behavior. After only briefly beginning his search for his forsaken wife and child, “he resolved to register an oath, a greater oath than he had ever sworn before.”  Although this decision resulted in a loss of time, he failed s to consider the impact that this might have on his search. Rather, he finds the nearest church and pledges to abstain from alcohol consumption for twenty-one years. (This decision is as rash and immoderate as the first.) These actions are not isolated incidents. On the contrary, they are indicative of an impulsive personality. For instance, when Henchard has established himself as the mayor of Casterbridge, Susan (the wife he sold like chattel) remarks that she notices his “sudden liking for that young man” (Donald Farfrae). On the next morning, despite Farfrae’s protestations, Henchard convinces him to remain in Casterbridge. He hires him as his manager although he has a previously agreed to hire another man (Joshua Jopp).
Hardy describes "Mr Henchard as a man of strong impulses." Discuss briefly with the reference to the wife selling episodes.

I need at least 3 examples of 1960’s war songs. Please help!I need examples of war songs from the 1960’s or early 1970’s for my history of popular…

I need at least 3 examples of 1960’s war songs. Please help!I need examples of war songs from the 1960’s or early 1970’s for my history of popular…

I need at least 3 examples of 1960’s war songs. Please help!I need examples of war songs from the 1960’s or early 1970’s for my history of popular…

I need at least 3 examples of 1960’s war songs. Please help!I need examples of war songs from the 1960’s or early 1970’s for my history of popular…

The song I associate most with antiwar protests, and that you hear most often in documentaries about the Vietnam war, is “I’m Fixin’ to Die” by Country Joe and the Fish. You’ve been given excellent suggestions by the other editors who have responded, so you certainly need to start with those. I would also add “Eve of Destruction,”; “Where Have All the Flowers Gone?” “In the Year 2525,” “Billy, Don’t Be a Hero,” and “I’d Like to Teach the World to Sing” (this song was used in a Coke commercial in the early 70s, but it is an antiwar song).I hope this helps!
I need at least 3 examples of 1960’s war songs. Please help!I need examples of war songs from the 1960’s or early 1970’s for my history of popular…

In Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, the theme of first impression..whatmight be the pre-practical response of the reader..and also what might…

In Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, the theme of first impression..whatmight be the pre-practical response of the reader..and also what might…

In Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, the theme of first impression..whatmight be the pre-practical response of the reader..and also what might…

In Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, the theme of first impression..whatmight be the pre-practical response of the reader..and also what might…

I will make an attempt to answer the gist of your question, based on what I think you are asking (your question is not clear from the heading to the subheading).OK- Practical Criticism  (response) is basically the traditional criticism “in real time”, that is, you call what you see. Certainly in the case of first impressions, practical criticism was very common in Pride and Prejudice from the beginning of the story.Mr Bingley and his party, as they arrived at the country displayed the countenance and mannerisms of the upper classes, which much awed and pleased eveyrone around them.Mr. Wickham, superficially a wronged, victimized soldier, was a kniving, and scheming loser who even elooped with Elizabeth’s sister Lydia much to the shameof the family.Lady Katherine de Bourgh was the exemplified aristocrat whom the lower classes emulate and fancy and feel obsessed with, yet she was petulant, unintelligent and snobby.In Pride and Prejudice the shallowness of the worst characters is illustrated by a great first impression caused among others, followed by quite the opposite reactions.The PRE practical response is what everyone expected from the character based on what society expects of people of certain class and character. So, without asking, everyone felt that aristocracy and money buy class.  The Practical responses, called as they see it, have a lot to do with how they felt once they understood how first impressions were many times wrong in the course of the story.
In Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, the theme of first impression..whatmight be the pre-practical response of the reader..and also what might…

To where will Macduff travel?

To where will Macduff travel?

To where will Macduff travel?

To where will Macduff travel?

This is sort of a generic question and you could probably be more likely to get the right answer if you give more information.  It is especially helpful if you know what act this comes from, or what it comes after.That said, I think that the answer you are looking for is probably England.  This is from Act IV.  Macduff does travel to England to try to help Malcolm.  Malcolm is in England trying to get support for his fight against Macbeth.  Macduff does not like the way things are going in Scotland under Macbeth’s rule so he goes to England to consult with Malcolm and perhaps help him.
To where will Macduff travel?

Chapter 5What is the weather like in this chapter? How does it reflect on the emotional climate of Gatsby and Daisy?I read the chapter and i saw…

Chapter 5What is the weather like in this chapter? How does it reflect on the emotional climate of Gatsby and Daisy?I read the chapter and i saw…

Chapter 5What is the weather like in this chapter? How does it reflect on the emotional climate of Gatsby and Daisy?I read the chapter and i saw…

Chapter 5What is the weather like in this chapter? How does it reflect on the emotional climate of Gatsby and Daisy?I read the chapter and i saw…

The rain can be read two ways:1) as a purgation (outpour/downpour) of emotion: this is what Gatsby feels and expects Daisy to feel, but the date/reunion is awkward, a bit anticlimactic.2) as a link and a way back to the past. Fitzgerald says in chapter 9:“tomorrow we will run faster, stretch our arms out father… so we beat on, boats against the current, born back ceaselessly into the past.”Chapter 5 is the turning point / fulcrum of the novel: it’s in the middle for a reason.  In chapter 5, Gatsby wants to get in his little boat and travel back on the sea of history into the past.
Chapter 5What is the weather like in this chapter? How does it reflect on the emotional climate of Gatsby and Daisy?I read the chapter and i saw…

What would a modern girl’s response to the shepherd’s "invitation" sound like?

What would a modern girl’s response to the shepherd’s "invitation" sound like?

What would a modern girl’s response to the shepherd’s "invitation" sound like?

What would a modern girl’s response to the shepherd’s "invitation" sound like?

If a modern girl were educated and not too indoctrinated by our still somewhat patriarchal society, her response would probably sound something like Raleigh’s, “The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd.”One would have to be fairly naive and gullible to fall for lines like the shepherd’s today. But, I suppose, it would depend on the “modern” girl, and, of course, on whether the modern girl was in love with the shepherd. If you’re speaking in general terms, though, I would look at Raleigh’s reply I mention above, and then look for ways in which a modern girl might differ from the nymph.
What would a modern girl’s response to the shepherd’s "invitation" sound like?

What does Capulet then tell Paris?Capulet changes his mind about Paris’ question.

What does Capulet then tell Paris?Capulet changes his mind about Paris’ question.

What does Capulet then tell Paris?Capulet changes his mind about Paris’ question.

What does Capulet then tell Paris?Capulet changes his mind about Paris’ question.

This depends some on where in the play you are talking about.  When you ask questions on here, you’ll get better answers if you are more specific with your question.  We don’t know what came before…But my guess is that you are talking about the part in Act I where Paris is asking Capulet to let him marry Juliet.  In that part (Scene 2) Capulet has two different answers.  First he says that Juliet is too young to get married.  But then Paris persists.  Capulet then responds by changing his mind a bit.  He says that it will be okay with him as long as Paris can persuade Juliet to agree.  So he gives two answers there and the second one might be what you’re asking about.
What does Capulet then tell Paris?Capulet changes his mind about Paris’ question.

In The Outcast of Pokerflats how did the committee decide to banish the "outcasts"?

In The Outcast of Pokerflats how did the committee decide to banish the "outcasts"?

In The Outcast of Pokerflats how did the committee decide to banish the "outcasts"?

In The Outcast of Pokerflats how did the committee decide to banish the "outcasts"?

Apparently there was no lawman to uphold the peace and order in the town of Poker Flat, so a “secret committee had determined to rid the town of all improper persons.” Because of a recent rash of theft (and possibly murder), this committee took action by hanging two of the more serious violators; for the less serious objectionable characters, the committee chose to banish them from the town. Such was the case of the gambler, John Oakhurst; two ladies whose “impropriety was professional;” and the ne’er-do-well, Uncle Billy. They were escorted to the edge of town and sent on their way.
In The Outcast of Pokerflats how did the committee decide to banish the "outcasts"?

What are two of the commandements that are broken, and what reasons do the pigs give for breaking each one in chapter 6 and 7?

What are two of the commandements that are broken, and what reasons do the pigs give for breaking each one in chapter 6 and 7?

What are two of the commandements that are broken, and what reasons do the pigs give for breaking each one in chapter 6 and 7?

What are two of the commandements that are broken, and what reasons do the pigs give for breaking each one in chapter 6 and 7?

There are three commandments broken in these chapters:1. Whatever goes upon two legs is an enemy.4. No animal shall sleep in a bed.7. No animal shall kill any other animal.Engaging in trade with Whymper breaks the first commandment because he has two legs. The pigs argue this had to be done in order to provide the animals with necessary items like dog biscuits, iron for horse shoes, paraffin oil, and eventually food for the animals, their farm wasn’t going to provide it all.They changed the 4th commandment toNo animal shall sleep in a bed with sheets.They argued this one away by stating that the beds provided a minimum amount of comfort necessary for them to complete their brain work. They also pointed out how ridiculous it would be if the commandment had been that animals couldn’t sleep in beds because even a bunch of straw is a bed.Finally, in chapter 7, animals believe (although it isn’t true) that they have been in cooperation with Snowball, for which the price is now apparently death. No pig really offered any discussion after this with any reason, they just left.
What are two of the commandements that are broken, and what reasons do the pigs give for breaking each one in chapter 6 and 7?

What is the summary for Tales from Firozisha Baag by Rohinton Mistry?

What is the summary for Tales from Firozisha Baag by Rohinton Mistry?

What is the summary for Tales from Firozisha Baag by Rohinton Mistry?

What is the summary for Tales from Firozisha Baag by Rohinton Mistry?

Since this is a book of short stories, a summary is not possible except a summery of the overall effect.This is one of the best books of short stories I have read in a very long time.  In his novels, Mistry uses a central motif or image to tie his stories together.  In Such a Long Journey, it is the wall, whereas in A Fine Balance, it is the quilt.  In the short story “Swimming Lessons” in the collection Tales From Firozsha Baag it is the apartment complex called Firozisha Bagh.We meet a variety of people who live in the complex.  In one story one may be a major character yet in another a minor character but what is more important for a western reader is that these people are our neighbors too despite the fact that they live in India.  Their stories are our stories, too.In summary, the book is a slice of life.
What is the summary for Tales from Firozisha Baag by Rohinton Mistry?