In Ulysses by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, what are Ulysses’ feelings toward his wife and son?

In Ulysses by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, what are Ulysses’ feelings toward his wife and son?

In Ulysses by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, what are Ulysses’ feelings toward his wife and son?

In Ulysses by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, what are Ulysses’ feelings toward his wife and son?

I’m afraid his wife doesn’t get much mention in Tennyson’s “Ulysses.”  The only thought the speaker has of her is that she is “aged.”  He opens the poem:It little profits that an idle king,By this still hearth, among these barren crags,Matched with an aged wife, I mete and doleUnequal laws unto a savage race,…Telemachus fares a little better.  Ulysses wants to leave his kingdom to him, and considers his son a worthy successor.  Tennyson writes:This is my son, mine own Telemachus,To whom I leave the scepter and the isle?Well-loved of me, discerning to fulfillThis labor, by slow prudence to make mildA rugged people, and through soft degreesSubdue them to the useful and the good.Most blameless is he, centered in the sphereOf common duties, decent not to failIn offices of ternderness, and payMeet adoration to my household gods,When I am gone.  He works his work, I mine.Telemachus is more suited to ruling–rather than adventuring–than Ulysses is.  Ulysses loves him and recognizes that his son is better at domestic duties.  He will subdue the people with “soft degree,” and lead them to the good and the useful.Both his wife and son, though, are secondary in the poem.  Ulysses’ interests in this poem lie in adventure, and his family is not a part of that.
In Ulysses by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, what are Ulysses’ feelings toward his wife and son?
In Ulysses by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, what are Ulysses’ feelings toward his wife and son?
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In Ulysses by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, what are Ulysses’ feelings toward his wife and son?
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