In "The Story of an Hour" what is the apparent attitude of the narrator toward the institution of marriage?

In "The Story of an Hour" what is the apparent attitude of the narrator toward the institution of marriage?

In "The Story of an Hour" what is the apparent attitude of the narrator toward the institution of marriage?

In "The Story of an Hour" what is the apparent attitude of the narrator toward the institution of marriage?

Marriage is seen as an controlling institution which denies women the ability to voice their own autonomy.  This is seen in several instances in the short story.  The first would be Louise’s initial reaction to news of her husband’s death.  The narrator makes it fairly clear that Louise is supposed to mourn, as per social convention.  Pay attention to the tone and language used to describe this.  Even from the earliest stages of the narration, the idea is conveyed that while Mr. Mallard was not that bad of a guy as far as men goes, Louise is supposed to feel a certain way.  When Louise goes upstairs and is alone, she experiences quite a different reaction for she is now able to accept her own autonomy, her own freedom, and her own voice.  The narration swells as it enters her mind, indicating that marriage, the institution and practice of it, helped to keep these elements repressed or lulled into dormancy.
In "The Story of an Hour" what is the apparent attitude of the narrator toward the institution of marriage?
In "The Story of an Hour" what is the apparent attitude of the narrator toward the institution of marriage?
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In "The Story of an Hour" what is the apparent attitude of the narrator toward the institution of marriage?
Read More