In act 2 scene 3 -4 he cautions Romeo saying, "wiseley and slow; they stumble that fun fast".Then he violates his own admonition. HOW??

In act 2 scene 3 -4 he cautions Romeo saying, "wiseley and slow; they stumble that fun fast".Then he violates his own admonition. HOW??

In act 2 scene 3 -4 he cautions Romeo saying, "wiseley and slow; they stumble that fun fast".Then he violates his own admonition. HOW??

In act 2 scene 3 -4 he cautions Romeo saying, "wiseley and slow; they stumble that fun fast".Then he violates his own admonition. HOW??

Another inrepretation for the Friar’s (and Romeo’s) haste in the play ‘Romeo and Juliet’ by William Shakespeare is his anxiousness to prevent ‘an occasion of sin.’ For example, he can see and sense Romeo’s haste, and that of Juliet and may feel that it is better for them to be married if they are going to spend the night together anyway. At least, in the eyes of the church/God, they are then married, one flesh, man and wife. The Friar may feel he is in the right doing God’s work here, but nowadays parents, professionals and teachers would see this very differently. He makes the situation worse because he does not stop to think about other matches the parents may have in mind. Despite his reservations, he seems to get carried away himself.
In act 2 scene 3 -4 he cautions Romeo saying, "wiseley and slow; they stumble that fun fast".Then he violates his own admonition. HOW??
In act 2 scene 3 -4 he cautions Romeo saying, "wiseley and slow; they stumble that fun fast".Then he violates his own admonition. HOW??
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In act 2 scene 3 -4 he cautions Romeo saying, "wiseley and slow; they stumble that fun fast".Then he violates his own admonition. HOW??
Read More