How is summer intemperate in "Shall I compare thee to a summers day?"

How is summer intemperate in "Shall I compare thee to a summers day?"

How is summer intemperate in "Shall I compare thee to a summers day?"

How is summer intemperate in "Shall I compare thee to a summers day?"

If something is “temperate” that means that it is not too extreme.  In the case of weather, not too hot, not too cold, not too windy, and so on.  In this poem, Shakespeare is saying that a summer’s day is not temperate enough — it is too extreme — to be compared to his love.Specifically, he says that summer days can be too hot (the eye of heaven shines too hot).  And he says that they can be too windy (rough winds shake “the darling buds of May”).For those reasons, they are not a good comparison for how wonderful his love is.
How is summer intemperate in "Shall I compare thee to a summers day?"
How is summer intemperate in "Shall I compare thee to a summers day?"
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How is summer intemperate in "Shall I compare thee to a summers day?"
Read More