How does Charles Dickens describe human beings in Book I?A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

How does Charles Dickens describe human beings in Book I?A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

How does Charles Dickens describe human beings in Book I?A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

How does Charles Dickens describe human beings in Book I?A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

In Chapter 3 of Book the First of A Tale of Two Cities, Charles Dickens appears to digress from his narrative; however, he really furthers his theme of dualities.  For, he mentions that what we know of people may not be what they actually are.A wonderful [meaning cause for wonder] fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.  A solemn consideration, when I enter a great city by night, that every one of those darkly clustered houses encloses its own secret; that every room in every one of them encloses its own secret; that every beating heart in the hundreds of thousands of breasts ther, is, in some of its imaginings a secret to the heart nearest it!In short, people are inscrutable, even those that are closest to one–even the “my neighbour, my love, the darling of my soul.” This inscrutable nature of human beings is what Jerry Cruncher ponders as he returns to London with the abstruse message of “Recalled to Life.”  In the coach “with the three passengers shut up in the narrow compass” of the coach they “were mysteries to one another, as complete as if each had been in his own coach and six….”  This motif of people not knowing or understanding each other later manifests itself in the duality of Dr. Manette, Sydney Carton, Charles Darnay, Madame Defarge, and John Barsad.
How does Charles Dickens describe human beings in Book I?A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
How does Charles Dickens describe human beings in Book I?A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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How does Charles Dickens describe human beings in Book I?A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Read More