How do overprotective fathers in "A Rose for Emily" and "Saturday Climbing" have a negative influence on their daughters?

How do overprotective fathers in "A Rose for Emily" and "Saturday Climbing" have a negative influence on their daughters?

How do overprotective fathers in "A Rose for Emily" and "Saturday Climbing" have a negative influence on their daughters?

How do overprotective fathers in "A Rose for Emily" and "Saturday Climbing" have a negative influence on their daughters?

Both of these stories (and especially “A Rose for Emily”) show fathers who are too protective of their daughters.  In both cases, the daughters end up hurt in some way (again, Emily is way worse off than Moira).In “Emily,” the father thought that no man was good enough for Emily and he kept driving off men who were interested.  Eventually, this led Emily to be so desperate that she killed Homer Barron when (perhaps) he wanted to leave her.In the other story, Moira is not nearly so messed up.  The only problem there is that she has sort of turned on her father.  She is determined to go off to college far away and she no longer wants to have much to do with her dad (although the end of the story seems to imply there is hope for both of them).
How do overprotective fathers in "A Rose for Emily" and "Saturday Climbing" have a negative influence on their daughters?