"Fair is foul,foul is fair"–how is it proved in the entire play of Macbeth?

"Fair is foul,foul is fair"–how is it proved in the entire play of Macbeth?

"Fair is foul,foul is fair"–how is it proved in the entire play of Macbeth?

"Fair is foul,foul is fair"–how is it proved in the entire play of Macbeth?

In Shakespeare’s Macbeth, the witches first use the line you ask about in Act 1.1:Fair is foul, and foul is fair.Macbeth then echoes them in Act 1.3:So foul and fair a day I have not seen.First, Macbeth is identified with and connected to the witches by his echo.  but there is more to the similar quotes than just this.The line establishes and contributes to the theme of illusion-reality in the play.  In Macbeth what seems to be fair is often foul, and even when the fair isn’t foul, it may be suspected of being foul.This is evident at numerous points in the play.  I’ll mention a few.Duncan tells Malcolm that there is no way to know what is on a man’s mind by looking at a man’s face, and that Cawdor, the traitor, was a man he had trusted absolutely.Duncan trusts Macbeth, also, and Macbeth assassinates him.Banquo is not in the process of rebelling against Macbeth, although he does suspect him of treachery.  Macbeth kills him because he suspects him.Malcolm is not sure whether or not he can trust Macduff when Macduff comes to England to join Malcolm in a fight against Macbeth, so Malcolm puts him through a series of tests.  Macduff passes.The witches equivocate and deceive Macbeth.  They tell him things which sound true, but are deceptively untrue.The theme of illusion-reality is prevelant in the play, and is introduced and contributed to by the idea of the fair and the foul.
"Fair is foul,foul is fair"–how is it proved in the entire play of Macbeth?
"Fair is foul,foul is fair"–how is it proved in the entire play of Macbeth?
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"Fair is foul,foul is fair"–how is it proved in the entire play of Macbeth?
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