A young man caught by the nightmare: mortal sickness, surrounded by bootlickers, broken dreams. Is Kurtz a tragic Quixote?FurtherKurtz can not…

A young man caught by the nightmare: mortal sickness, surrounded by bootlickers, broken dreams. Is Kurtz a tragic Quixote?FurtherKurtz can not…

A young man caught by the nightmare: mortal sickness, surrounded by bootlickers, broken dreams. Is Kurtz a tragic Quixote?FurtherKurtz can not…

A young man caught by the nightmare: mortal sickness, surrounded by bootlickers, broken dreams. Is Kurtz a tragic Quixote?FurtherKurtz can not…

An interesting question…but in my opinion, no, Kurtz is not a tragic Quixote. Too much of Kurtz is overly materialistic and imperialistic to be quixotic in any sense of the word. We get no glimmer of idealism or even optimism is any of his words or behaviors; he is simply a rotten man to the core who finally found his opportunity to manipulate others and feed his self-absorbed greed and narcissism.In order to be tragic, a character would have to have some overriding redeeming qualities in addition to falling from a relatively high position in society to a relatively low position in society. Although he might qualify as possessing the later, he certainly does not possess the former. It isn’t until the very end of the novella, when Marlow goes to meet with Kurtz fiancee that get even the slightest glimmer that Kurtz was a decent and upstanding man and even then we question the credibility of this point of view. But by then, it is far too late.
A young man caught by the nightmare: mortal sickness, surrounded by bootlickers, broken dreams. Is Kurtz a tragic Quixote?FurtherKurtz can not…
A young man caught by the nightmare: mortal sickness, surrounded by bootlickers, broken dreams. Is Kurtz a tragic Quixote?FurtherKurtz can not…
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A young man caught by the nightmare: mortal sickness, surrounded by bootlickers, broken dreams. Is Kurtz a tragic Quixote?FurtherKurtz can not…
Read More