What would a modern girl’s response to the shepherd’s "invitation" sound like?

What would a modern girl’s response to the shepherd’s "invitation" sound like?

What would a modern girl’s response to the shepherd’s "invitation" sound like?

What would a modern girl’s response to the shepherd’s "invitation" sound like?

If a modern girl were educated and not too indoctrinated by our still somewhat patriarchal society, her response would probably sound something like Raleigh’s, “The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd.”One would have to be fairly naive and gullible to fall for lines like the shepherd’s today. But, I suppose, it would depend on the “modern” girl, and, of course, on whether the modern girl was in love with the shepherd. If you’re speaking in general terms, though, I would look at Raleigh’s reply I mention above, and then look for ways in which a modern girl might differ from the nymph.
What would a modern girl’s response to the shepherd’s "invitation" sound like?

What does Capulet then tell Paris?Capulet changes his mind about Paris’ question.

What does Capulet then tell Paris?Capulet changes his mind about Paris’ question.

What does Capulet then tell Paris?Capulet changes his mind about Paris’ question.

What does Capulet then tell Paris?Capulet changes his mind about Paris’ question.

This depends some on where in the play you are talking about.  When you ask questions on here, you’ll get better answers if you are more specific with your question.  We don’t know what came before…But my guess is that you are talking about the part in Act I where Paris is asking Capulet to let him marry Juliet.  In that part (Scene 2) Capulet has two different answers.  First he says that Juliet is too young to get married.  But then Paris persists.  Capulet then responds by changing his mind a bit.  He says that it will be okay with him as long as Paris can persuade Juliet to agree.  So he gives two answers there and the second one might be what you’re asking about.
What does Capulet then tell Paris?Capulet changes his mind about Paris’ question.

In The Outcast of Pokerflats how did the committee decide to banish the "outcasts"?

In The Outcast of Pokerflats how did the committee decide to banish the "outcasts"?

In The Outcast of Pokerflats how did the committee decide to banish the "outcasts"?

In The Outcast of Pokerflats how did the committee decide to banish the "outcasts"?

Apparently there was no lawman to uphold the peace and order in the town of Poker Flat, so a “secret committee had determined to rid the town of all improper persons.” Because of a recent rash of theft (and possibly murder), this committee took action by hanging two of the more serious violators; for the less serious objectionable characters, the committee chose to banish them from the town. Such was the case of the gambler, John Oakhurst; two ladies whose “impropriety was professional;” and the ne’er-do-well, Uncle Billy. They were escorted to the edge of town and sent on their way.
In The Outcast of Pokerflats how did the committee decide to banish the "outcasts"?

What are two of the commandements that are broken, and what reasons do the pigs give for breaking each one in chapter 6 and 7?

What are two of the commandements that are broken, and what reasons do the pigs give for breaking each one in chapter 6 and 7?

What are two of the commandements that are broken, and what reasons do the pigs give for breaking each one in chapter 6 and 7?

What are two of the commandements that are broken, and what reasons do the pigs give for breaking each one in chapter 6 and 7?

There are three commandments broken in these chapters:1. Whatever goes upon two legs is an enemy.4. No animal shall sleep in a bed.7. No animal shall kill any other animal.Engaging in trade with Whymper breaks the first commandment because he has two legs. The pigs argue this had to be done in order to provide the animals with necessary items like dog biscuits, iron for horse shoes, paraffin oil, and eventually food for the animals, their farm wasn’t going to provide it all.They changed the 4th commandment toNo animal shall sleep in a bed with sheets.They argued this one away by stating that the beds provided a minimum amount of comfort necessary for them to complete their brain work. They also pointed out how ridiculous it would be if the commandment had been that animals couldn’t sleep in beds because even a bunch of straw is a bed.Finally, in chapter 7, animals believe (although it isn’t true) that they have been in cooperation with Snowball, for which the price is now apparently death. No pig really offered any discussion after this with any reason, they just left.
What are two of the commandements that are broken, and what reasons do the pigs give for breaking each one in chapter 6 and 7?

What is the summary for Tales from Firozisha Baag by Rohinton Mistry?

What is the summary for Tales from Firozisha Baag by Rohinton Mistry?

What is the summary for Tales from Firozisha Baag by Rohinton Mistry?

What is the summary for Tales from Firozisha Baag by Rohinton Mistry?

Since this is a book of short stories, a summary is not possible except a summery of the overall effect.This is one of the best books of short stories I have read in a very long time.  In his novels, Mistry uses a central motif or image to tie his stories together.  In Such a Long Journey, it is the wall, whereas in A Fine Balance, it is the quilt.  In the short story “Swimming Lessons” in the collection Tales From Firozsha Baag it is the apartment complex called Firozisha Bagh.We meet a variety of people who live in the complex.  In one story one may be a major character yet in another a minor character but what is more important for a western reader is that these people are our neighbors too despite the fact that they live in India.  Their stories are our stories, too.In summary, the book is a slice of life.
What is the summary for Tales from Firozisha Baag by Rohinton Mistry?

What is symbolic about the narrator’s house resting on an insecure foundation in "Once Upon a Time"?

What is symbolic about the narrator’s house resting on an insecure foundation in "Once Upon a Time"?

What is symbolic about the narrator’s house resting on an insecure foundation in "Once Upon a Time"?

What is symbolic about the narrator’s house resting on an insecure foundation in "Once Upon a Time"?

The thematic concern of “Once Upon a Time” is security. At the mother-in-law’s behest, ever-growing security measures are put in place. These security measures begin with medical benefits and insurance policies and escalate from a “You Have Been Warned” sign on the front gate to iron bars on the windows to more bricks (a Christmas, no less) for a higher fence. The final security measure is jagged metal and coiled wire atop the high brick wall.All these security measures result in the son, who has just been read Sleeping Beauty, envisions the metal and wire as his own obstacle to his sleeping princess. In this make-believe world, he scales the wall intending to make it victoriously to the other side. Instead, he is ensnared and impaled by the metal and wire and loses his life. The thematic concerns are brought to a close with the knowledge that the security measures were based on an insecure foundation, that being one of unbridled fear, mostly fear of those who “the other.”
What is symbolic about the narrator’s house resting on an insecure foundation in "Once Upon a Time"?

How does Shakespeare describe lady Macbeth is a witchlike person?in as much detail possible

How does Shakespeare describe lady Macbeth is a witchlike person?in as much detail possible

How does Shakespeare describe lady Macbeth is a witchlike person?in as much detail possible

How does Shakespeare describe lady Macbeth is a witchlike person?in as much detail possible

In Shakespeare’s Macbeth, like a witch, Lady Macbeth conjures spirits in Act 1.5.  She asks the spirits to “unsex” her:  turn her from a female to a male so she can be evil and ruthless enough to kill Duncan.  This connects her to the witches in the play, not only because she is conjuring spirits, but because the witches appear to be women, yet have beards (Act 1.3).  They are androgynous, as Lady Macbeth would like to be.    She is also similar to the witches in her use of lying, false appearances, equivocating.  The witches serve as catalyst for the conflict by predicting Macbeth will be Cawdor and king of England, and then later reassuring him of his safety and success by predicting that he cannot be harmed until Birnam Wood moves, and that he cannot be harmed by a man born of woman.Lady Macbeth acts, and orders her husband to act, as if their is nothing wrong when Duncan comes to visit their castle.  She lies about what’s wrong with her husband after he sees Banquo’s ghost at dinner.  She acts surprised when Duncan’s body is discovered. Put simply, Lady Macbeth is considered to be a witch-like person, because she is a witch-like person.
How does Shakespeare describe lady Macbeth is a witchlike person?in as much detail possible

What is a personal trait of The Diary of Samuel Pepys?

What is a personal trait of The Diary of Samuel Pepys?

What is a personal trait of The Diary of Samuel Pepys?

What is a personal trait of The Diary of Samuel Pepys?

Samuel Pepy’s The Diary is, of course, a diary, so there are numerous personal elements in it.  “Personal trait” is a bit vague (physical characteristic? writing style? what he experiences?), so I’m not sure exactly what you’re looking for, but I’ll do what i can. I guess I will mention one personality trait.  The author is reflective.  In his entry for Sept. 14, 1615, he writes:When I come home I spent some thoughts upon the occurrences of this day, giving matter for as much content on one hand and melancholy on another, as any day in all my life….Of course, reflecting must surely be a natural act for a diarist, but it is as well a personality trait of Samuel Pepys.
What is a personal trait of The Diary of Samuel Pepys?

I have to write a children’s book on the loss of innocence cycle. What would be the first thing I have to write about Scout in her perfect world?

I have to write a children’s book on the loss of innocence cycle. What would be the first thing I have to write about Scout in her perfect world?

I have to write a children’s book on the loss of innocence cycle. What would be the first thing I have to write about Scout in her perfect world?

I have to write a children’s book on the loss of innocence cycle. What would be the first thing I have to write about Scout in her perfect world?

I would like to offer something different from what missy575 has posted. In addition to being a tomboy, Scout is (paradoxically) a daddy’s girl. One of the perfect moments for her, a moment represented in several places in the novel, involves sitting on her father’s lap while he reads to her. This perfect moment seems to me to fit very well with the idea of a children’s book.I’m not completely convinced that Harper Lee’s novel To Kill a Mockingbird is a story about loss of innocence, but you certainly can read it that way. You may be interested in tracking, for example, how Scout matures in her understanding of stories. At first she takes the stories about Boo Radley literally. At the end of the novel, she’s again sitting in her father’s lap while he reads to her, but I get the sense that she’s grown up at least a little. Now, perhaps, she enjoys stories as stories. She has developed in her ability to distinguish between fantasy and reality while keeping the ability to enjoy fantasy (or stories).
I have to write a children’s book on the loss of innocence cycle. What would be the first thing I have to write about Scout in her perfect world?